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Garry Wilson, head of the Historic and Classic Vehicles Alliance (HCVA), said owners “wouldn’t contribute much to negative air quality” if they used their classic cars at certain times of the day. He said London’s ULEZ charges should be reviewed on a “time-constrained basis” to ensure some leeway for motorists.

Speaking to Express.co.uk, he said: “There are several things, there is a lot of confusion.

“If it’s particulates and the general air quality issue, a clear focus on heavy-duty diesel vehicles is the most critical.

“So it’s not about generating revenue, it’s really about the shows.

“So surely these people can drive their vehicles in the evenings and on weekends.

READ MORE: Classic car owners could be ‘much more penalized’ in car tax changes

“If you have a 1989 MG Montego and want to drive it to a club meeting in the evening, after say 7pm or on weekends, why should you get [charged].

“There are no children in the schools, you are not contributing a lot to the negative air quality.

“An immediate thing that could be done is to review it on a time constraint basis.”

Classic cars over 40 years old are exempt from paying the ULEZ or Congestion Charge.

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Head – Classic car owners shouldn’t face evening and weekend ULEZ fees, campaigners urge

Head 2 – Car Tax Changes: Classic car owners should not pay ULEZ fees on evenings and weekends

Head 3 – Classic car owners shouldn’t pay car taxes because they “don’t contribute to negative air quality”

Meta – Car tax changes: owners of classic cars should not pay London ULEZ charges in the evenings and at weekends

Short – Classic Car Owners Shouldn’t Face Car Taxes

url – car tax change owners of classic cars in london ulez

Campaigners say owners of CLASSIC CARS should not be charged London Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) car taxes in the evenings and at weekends.

Gary Wilson, head of the Historic and Classic Vehicles Alliance (HCVA), said owners “wouldn’t contribute much to negative air quality” if they used their car at certain times of the day.

He said the charges should be reviewed on a ‘time constraint’ basis to ensure some leeway for motorists.

Speaking to Express.co.uk, he said: “There are several things, there is a lot of confusion.

“If it’s particulates and the general air quality issue, a clear focus on heavy-duty diesel vehicles is the most critical.

“So it’s not about generating revenue, it’s really about the shows.

“So surely these people can drive their vehicles in the evenings and on weekends.

“If you have a 1989 MG Montego and want to drive it to a club meeting in the evening, after say 7pm or on weekends, why should you get [punished].

“There are no children in the schools, you are not contributing a lot to the negative air quality.

“An immediate thing that could be done is to review it on a time constraint basis.”

Classic cars over 40 years old are exempt from paying the ULEZ or Congestion Charge.

However, vehicles manufactured after 1982 still have to pay the fee.

Unlike the Congestion Zone which has set evening end times, London’s ULEZ operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Even drivers making a short trip inside the charging zone have to pay a fee of £12.50 per day.

This includes residents of those who live inside the charging zone that extends between the North and South Circular.

Data from a report by the Federation of British Historic Vehicle Clubs (FBHVC) previously showed that classic car owners only drive around 1,200 miles a year.

By comparison, the average car mileage in the UK is around 7,200.

The report also revealed that classic cars are only driven 16 times a year.

A CEBR report for HERO-ERA revealed that classic cars produce around 563 kg of CO2 per year.

By comparison, they warn that computers use around 1,400 kg of CO2 per year, while mobile phones generate 1,250 kg of CO2 per year.

According to the HCVA, this means that driving a classic car accounts for around 20% of the emissions generated by using a mobile phone and a computer for a year.

Classic car insurance experts at Hagerty have previously warned that driving a non-compliant car just once a week could result in a £650 bill.

Using a vehicle five days a week means the total costs will exceed £3,000.

Some Londoners have already admitted to Hagerty that they are considering selling their vehicles following the changes.

Michael Griffin was just a resident who considered selling his car last year despite years of meticulous maintenance of the model.

He said: ‘A lot of people like me are in a tough spot because it doesn’t matter how well they maintain their car, it doesn’t matter how many thousands of pounds you may have spent on it.

“It doesn’t matter how poor you are or if you are disabled, the green agenda is all that matters.”

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